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Reinforced Concrete: Mechanics and Design, 6th Edition by James K. Wight, James G. MacGregor pdf download

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Reinforced Concrete: Mechanics and Design, 6th Edition by James K. Wight, James G. MacGregor pdf download

Contents:
CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION 
CHAPTER 2 THE DESIGN PROCESS 
CHAPTER 3 MATERIALS 
CHAPTER 4 FLEXURE: BEHAVIOR AND NOMINAL STRENGTH OF BEAM SECTIONS
CHAPTER 5 FLEXURAL DESIGN OF BEAM SECTIONS 
CHAPTER 6 SHEAR IN BEAMS 
CHAPTER 7 TORSION 
CHAPTER 8 DEVELOPMENT, ANCHORAGE, AND SPLICING
OF REINFORCEMENT
CHAPTER 9 SERVICEABILITY 
CHAPTER 10 CONTINUOUS BEAMS AND ONE-WAY SLABS 
CHAPTER 11 COLUMNS: COMBINED AXIAL LOAD AND BENDING 
CHAPTER 12 SLENDER COLUMNS
CHAPTER 13 TWO-WAY SLABS: BEHAVIOR, ANALYSIS, AND DESIGN 
CHAPTER 14 TWO-WAY SLABS: ELASTIC AND YIELD-LINE ANALYSES 
CHAPTER 15 FOOTINGS 
CHAPTER 16 SHEAR FRICTION, HORIZONTAL SHEAR TRANSFER,
AND COMPOSITE CONCRETE BEAMS 
CHAPTER 17 DISCONTINUITY REGIONS AND STRUT-AND-TIE MODELS
CHAPTER 18 WALLS AND SHEAR WALLS 
CHAPTER 19 DESIGN FOR EARTHQUAKE RESISTANCE

Reinforced Concrete: Mechanics and Design, 6th Edition by James K. Wight, James G. MacGregor

Preface: Reinforced concrete design encompases both the art and science of engineering.

This book presents the theory of reinforced concrete design as a direct application of the laws of statics and mechanics of materials. It emphasizes that a successful design not only satisfies design rules, but is capable of being built in a timely fashion for a reasonable cost and should provide a long service life.

Philosophy of Reinforced Concrete:
Mechanics and Design
A multitiered approach makes Reinforced Concrete: Mechanics and Design an outstanding textbook for a variety of university courses on reinforced concrete design. Topics are normally introduced at a fundamental level, and then move to higher levels where prior educational experience and the development of engineering judgment will be required. The analysis of the flexural strength of beam sections is presented in Chapter 4. Because this is the first significant design-related topic, it is presented at a level appropriate for new students. Closely related material on the analysis of column sections for combined axial load and bending is presented in Chapter 11 at a somewhat higher level, but still at a level suitable for a first course on reinforced concrete design. Advanced subjects are also presented in the same chapters at levels suitable for advanced undergraduate or graduate students. These topics include, for example, the complete moment versus curvature behavior of a beam section with various tension reinforcement percentages and the use strain-compatibility to analyze either over-reinforced beam sections, or column sections with multiple layers of reinforcement. More advanced topics are covered in the later chapters, making this textbook valuable for both undergraduate and graduate courses, as well as serving as a key reference in design offices. Other features include the following:

1. Extensive figures are used to illustrate aspects of reinforced concrete member behavior and the design process.
2. Emphasis is placed on logical order and completeness for the many design examples presented in the book.
3. Guidance is given in the text and in examples to help students develop the engineering judgment required to become a successful designer of reinforced concrete structures.
4. Chapters 2 and 3 present general information on various topics related to structural design and construction, and concrete material properties. Frequent references are
made back to these topics throughout the text. 

Overview—What Is New in the Sixth Edition?
Professor Wight was the primary author of this edition and has made several changes in the coverage of various topics. All chapters have been updated to be in compliance with the 2011 edition of the ACI Building Code. New problems were developed for several chapters, and all of the examples throughout the text were either reworked or checked for accuracy. Other changes and some continuing features include the following:

1. The design of isolated column footings for the combined action of axial force and bending moment has been added to Chapter 15. The design of footing reinforcement and the procedure for checking shear stresses resulting from the transfer of axial force and moment from the column to the footing are presented. The shear stress check is essentially the same as is presented in Chapter 13 for two-way slab to column connections.

2. The design of coupled shear walls and coupling beams in seismic regions has been added to Chapter 19. This topic includes a discussion on coupling beams with moderate span-to-depth ratios, a subject that is not covered well in the ACI Building Code. 

3. New calculation procedures, based on the recommendations of ACI Committee 209, are given in Chapter 3 for the calculation of creep and shrinkage strains. These procedures are more succinct than the fib procedures that were referred to in the earlier editions of this textbook.

4. Changes of load factors and load combinations in the 2011 edition of the ACI Code are presented in Chapter 2. Procedures for including loads due to lateral earth pressure, fluid pressure, and self-straining effects have been modified, and to be consistent with ASCE/SEI 7-10, wind load factors have been changed because wind loads are now based on strength-level wind forces.

5. A new section on sustainability of concrete construction has been added to Chapter 2. Topics such as green construction, reduced CO2 emissions, life-cycle economic impact, thermal properties, and aesthetics of concrete buildings are discussed.

6. Flexural design procedures for the full spectrum of beam and slab sections are developed in Chapter 5. This includes a design procedure to select reinforcement when section dimensions are known and design procedures to develop efficient section dimensions and reasonable reinforcement ratios for both singly reinforced and doubly reinforced beams.

7. Extensive information is given for the structural analysis of both one-way (Chapter 5) and two-way (Chapter 13) continuous floor systems. Typical modeling assumptions for both systems and the interplay between analysis and design are discussed.

8. Appendix A contains axial load vs. moment interaction diagrams for a broad variety of column sections. These diagrams include the strength-reduction factor and are very useful for either a classroom or a design office.

9. Video solutions are provided to accompany problems and to offer step-by-step walkthroughs of representative problems throughout the book. Icons in the margin identify
the Video Solutions that are representative of various types of problems. Video Solutions along with a Pearson eText version of this book are provided on the companion Web site at http://www.pearsonhighered.com/wight.

Use of Textbook in Undergraduate and Graduate Courses
The following paragraphs give a suggested set of topics and chapters to be covered in the first and second reinforced concrete design courses, normally given at the undergraduate and graduate levels, respectively. It is assumed that these are semester courses. First Design Course:

Chapters 1 through 3 should be assigned, but the detailed information on loading in Chapter 2 can be covered in a second course. The information on concrete material properties in Chapter 3 could be covered with more depth in a separate undergraduate course. Chapters 4 and 5 are extremely important for all students and should form the foundation of the first undergraduate course. The information in Chapter 4 on moment vs. curvature behavior of beam sections is important for all designers, but this topic could be significantly expanded in a graduate course. Chapter 5 presents a variety of design procedures for developing efficient flexural designs of either singly-reinforced or doubly-reinforced sections. The discussion of structural analysis for continuous floor systems in Section 5-2 could be skipped if either time is limited or students are not yet prepared to handle this topic. The first undergraduate course should cover Chapter 6 information on member behavior in shear and the shear design requirements given in the ACI Code. Discussions of other methods for determining the shear strength of concrete members can be saved for a second design course. Design for torsion, as covered in Chapter 7, could be covered in a first design course, but more often is left for a second design course. The reinforcement anchorage provisions of Chapter 8 are important material for the first undergraduate design course. Students should develop a basic understanding of development length requirements for straight and hooked bars, as well as the procedure to determine bar cutoff points and the details required at those cutoff points. The serviceability requirements in Chapter 9 for control of deflections and cracking are also important topics for the first undergraduate course. In particular, the ability to do an elastic section analysis and find moments of inertia for cracked and uncracked sections is an important skill for designers of concrete structures. Chapter 10 serves to tie together all of the requirements for continuous floor systems introduced in Chapters 5 through 9. The examples include details for flexural and shear design, as well as full-span detailing of longitudinal and transverse reinforcement. This chapter could either be skipped for the first undergraduate course or be used as a source for a more extensive class design project. Chapter 11 concentrates on the analysis and design of columns sections and should be included in the first undergraduate course. The portion of Chapter 11 that covers column sections subjected to biaxial bending may either be included in a first undergraduate course or be saved for a graduate course. Chapter 12 considers slenderness effects in columns, and the more detailed analysis required for this topic is commonly presented in a graduate course. If time permits, the basic information in Chapter 15 on the design of typical concrete footings may be included in a first undergraduate course. This material may also be covered in a foundation design course taught at either the undergraduate or graduate level.

Second Design Course:
Clearly, the instructor in a graduate design course has many options for topics, depending on his/her interests and the preparation of the students. Chapter 13 is a lengthy chapter and is clearly intended to be a significant part of a graduate course. The chapter gives extensive coverage of flexural analysis and design of two-way floor systems that builds on the analysis and design of one-way floor systems covered in Chapter 5. The direct design method and the classic equivalent frame method are discussed, along with more modern analysis and modeling techniques. Problems related to punching shear and the combined transfer of shear and moment at slab-to-column connections are covered in detail. The design of slab shear reinforcement, including the use of shear studs, is also presented. Finally, procedures for calculating deflections in two-way floor systems are given. Design for torsion, as given in Chapter 7, should be covered in conjunction with the design and analysis of two-way floor systems in Chapter 13. The design procedure for compatibility torsion at the edges of a floor system has a direct impact on the design of adjacent floor members. The presentation of the yield-line method in Chapter 14 gives students an alternative analysis and design method for two-way slab systems. This topic could also tie in with plastic analysis methods taught in graduate level analysis courses. The analysis and design of slender columns, as presented in Chapter 12, should also be part of a graduate design course. The students should be prepared to apply the frame analysis and member modeling techniques required to either directly determine secondary moments or calculate the required moment-magnification factors. Also, if the topic of biaxial bending in Chapter 11 was not covered in the first design course, it could be included at this point. Chapter 18 covers bending and shear design of structural walls that resist lateral loads due to either wind or seismic effects. A capacity-design approach is introduced for the shear design of walls that resist earthquake-induced lateral forces. Chapter 17 covers the concept of disturbed regions (D-regions) and the use of the strutand-tie models to analyze the flow of forces through D-regions and to select appropriate reinforcement details. The chapter contains detailed examples to help students learn the concepts and code requirements for strut-and-tie models. If time permits, instructors could cover the design of combined footings in Chapter 15, shear-friction design concepts in Chapter 16, and design to resist earthquake-induced forces in Chapter 20.
JAMES K. WIGHT
JAMES G. MACGREGOR


Book Details:
⏩Edition: 6th edition
Authors: James K. Wight, James G. MacGregor
Language: English
Pages: 1177
Size: 15.3
Format: PDF

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