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Seismic Design For Architects: Outwitting The Quake by Andrew Charleson pdf download

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Seismic Design For Architects: Outwitting The Quake by Andrew Charleson.

Seismic Design For Architects: Outwitting The Quake by Andrew Charleson

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Contents:
1 Earthquakes and ground shaking 
2 How buildings resist earthquakes 
3 Seismic design approaches 
4 Horizontal structure 
5 Vertical structure 
6 Seismic design and architecture 
7 Foundations 
8 Horizontal configuration 
9 Vertical configuration 
10 Non-structural elements: those likely to cause  structural damage 
11 Other non-structural elements 
12 Retrofitting 
13 Professional collaboration and communication 
14 New technologies 
15 Urban planning 
16 Issues in developing countries 
17 Earthquake architecture 
18 Summary 
Index

Foreword by Andrew Charleson: knew that I would enjoy this book when I saw that Andrew Charleson had used one of my favorite buildings, the Villa Savoie in Paris, as a seismic design case study. The earthquake engineers ’ nightmare, with its pin-like pilotis, ramps and roof garden – the epitome of the free planned International Style dwelling – it floats above the field in Poissy, giving the illusion of being on the sea. The author uses his re-design to demonstrate that, to add seismic resistance as an afterthought to a completed preliminary design, results in a far from elegant solution given the incompatibility of the seismic-resisting structure with the intended interior planning. 

This little study is but one example of how he has made material, with which I am reasonably familiar, seem fresh and intriguing. I also liked his analogy between finger snapping and the sudden release of energy that initiates an earthquake.

Another pleasure was that in two hundred and sixty-odd pages he covers every seismic design issue under the sun with only a passing mention of seismic codes and only one (I believe) equation FMA. The seismic codes say nothing about seismic design, which is the act of conceiving a strategy for the reduction of seismic risk and the structural/architectural systems that will accomplish it. Reading, or reading about, building codes and regulations is only one form of slow torture. 

The author’s intent (with which I agree) is ambitious. Structure, he says, is an indispensable architectural element imbued with the possibility of enhancing architectural functions and qualities, and if structure is to play architectural roles other than load-bearing, its design cannot be left to just anybody. An architect, he says, should have the skills to conceive the structural configuration at the preliminary design stage, which not only satisfies programmatic requirements and his or her design ideas, but is structurally sound with respect to seismic forces. This book is intended to provide the means by which the architect (with considerable diligence) can acquire these skills. 

Such talk may, of course, upset our engineering friends (although note that the author is an engineer) and cause grumbling about the engineering ignorance of architects together with their unreasonable egotisms.

But the author is talking about preliminary design, the most important phase of the design process, in which all the overall configuration, the interior spaces, exterior skin, general dimensions and materials are defined. How can this be done properly without, at the same time, defining the structure? In fact, the author recommends collaboration between the engineer and architect at the earliest point in the design process. This will be more effective if the architect has a good knowledge of the structural issues. 

Faced with this self-imposed task, Andrew Charleson has, I think, written a landmark book in the exposition of complex structural and architectural concept issues that use lucid prose to describe concepts and hundreds of diagrams and photographs to illuminate his message. It is instructive to discover how many sophisticated structural concepts can be explained in word and illustration to help develop an intuitive sense of structural action and reaction. You can find out exactly why symmetrical plans are good, as well as many ways of circumventing them if they do not suit your site, program or building image. The author’s many years of experience teaching architectural students have enabled him to expand the range and refine the detail of his descriptions, and ensure their intelligibility. 

Finally, if the architect still resists the effort to understand the earthquake, it must be remembered that we are not talking about an intellectual or aesthetic game, but knowledge and its application that may, in some future unknown event, save lives, reduce injuries and lessen economic and social catastrophe. Besides which, the whole subject is inherently fascinating.
Christopher Arnold 

SEISMIC DESIGN FOR ARCHITECTS OU TW ITTING THE QUAKE.


Preface by Andrew Charleson: This book draws upon my structural engineering experience designing in the southern tip of the Pacific Rim of Fire, followed by twenty years teaching in a School of Architecture. Seismic design is a significant component in my Structures courses. These courses consist of formal lectures and tutorials, while including informal sessions where students are helped to develop seismic and gravity structure for their own architecture studio design projects. One of the most satisfying aspects of this less informal teaching is when students utilize structure not only to resist seismic and gravity forces but also to enrich their architectural design concepts. 

The premise underlying this book is that structure is an indispensable architectural element imbued with the possibility of enhancing architectural functions and qualities. For example, appropriately designed structure can articulate entry into a building and celebrate interior circulation. It can create spaces and provide opportunities for aesthetic delight. So in the first instance, at preliminary design stage, structure needs to be designed by an architect. 

The approach and content of the book is based upon that view of an architect’s role in seismic design. If structure is to play architectural roles other than load-bearing, its design cannot be left to someone else. An architect should have the skills to conceive the structural configuration at the preliminary design stage that not only satisfies programmatic requirements and his or her design ideas, but is structurally sound especially with respect to seismic forces. Subsequent to this conception of structure, and ideally during that preliminary design process, structural engineering collaboration is indispensable. Ideally a structural engineer with specialist technical skills – and a sensitivity towards architectural aspirations – works alongside the architect to develop and refine the initial structural form. The engineer, designing well beyond the technical abilities of the architect then determines member sizes and attends to all the other structural details and issues. 

Given the ideal situation outlined above, the book focuses on the core knowledge that architects require to ‘outwit the quake ’. Written for those designing buildings, its explanations provide the background, understanding, strategies and approaches to be applied in design.

Seismic principles and concepts rather than code requirements are emphasized. With a few exceptions, the book recognizes both the reality of architectural practice and architects ’ preferences by leaving equations and calculations to structural engineers. 

The intended readership is primarily architectural students and architects – hence the generous number of explanatory diagrams and images, and the exclusion of civil engineering structures like bridges, wharfs and dams. However, the conceptual treatment of seismic resistance will also appeal to students of structural engineering and engineers who appreciate a non-mathematical introduction to seismic design. The qualitative approach herein complements engineers ’ more calculation-intensive analysis and design methods, and covers the design of components such as non-structural elements that most engineering texts and codes treat very briefly. 

The chapter sequence of the book reflects a general progression in complexity. The gradual introduction of more complex issues is appropriate for architectural, architectural engineering and building science programmes. For example, the content of Chapters 1 and 2 is suited to first or second year courses, Chapters 3 to 5 to second or third years, and Chapters 6 to 11 to third or fourth years. Other chapters, especially Chapters 13 and 14 can be inserted into the senior years of a programme. The amount of material from the book that can be introduced into given courses may depend upon how much time a school’s curriculum allocates to Structures. The non-mathematical approach of this book suggests a reappraisal of how Structures might be taught. If emphasis upon the quantitative treatment of Structures is reduced in favour of the introduction of a broader range of structural topics taught qualitatively, then space can be created for more material on seismic design.
Andrew Charleson


Seismic Design For Architects: Outwitting The Quake by Andrew Charleson pdf.


Book Details:
⏩Author: Andrew Charleson
⏩ Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved 
⏩Language: English
⏩Pages: 296
⏩Size: 7.47 MB
⏩Format: PDF

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